Learn New Cooking Skills at the CIA Cooking Classes

Wednesday 23rd, November 2016 / 15:21 Written by
Learn New Cooking Skills at the CIA Cooking Classes

Learn New Cooking Skills at the Culinary Institute of America Cooking Classes

Here is your opportunity to learn new cooking skills from The Culinary Institute of America, the world’s premier culinary college, which is offering cooking classes to the public through their Food Enthusiast programming. Food Enthusiast classes include everything from their boot camps to wine and beverage classes, all taking place in the famed CIA Kitchens.

Here are some upcoming holiday-themed Food Enthusiast classes you will love. Information on the classes, dates, and links to tickets are included below, including pie-making and holiday cookie decorating classes:

RUSTIC APPLE GALETTE, GREAT AMERICAN MEALS FROM THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA?FEBRUARY 9 ISSUE Easier Than Pie? Sweet!  If you want to make something special for your sweetheart, there?s nothing quite like the smell of apples baking in the oven to say, ?I love you.? So why not give the CIA?s apple galette a try? You don?t even need a pie dish?just roll out the dough, place the filling in the center, and fold up the sides. And don?t worry?the more uneven the folds, the more rustic it looks. We made our galette with whole wheat flour, which not only offers better nutrition, but also gives it a more artisan look.  Visit usaweekend.com and watch the CIA?s Chef Bill show you how simple it is to make pie dough in your food processor. Side Dishes The galette originated in the Brittany region of northwest France. Made from buckwheat cooked over a wood fire, it was sometimes used as a replacement for bread.  Using whole wheat flour for many baked goods gives them a nutty flavor. Plus, whole grains are absorbed more slowly and will keep you satisfied longer.   Apples are the number-one tree fruit in the world and have been cultivated as far back as 300 B.C. in Greece. With so many varieties to choose from, try a new one?or a combination?in your galette. RUSTIC APPLE GALETTE Makes five 8-inch tarts ½ cup granulated sugar ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon 6 Granny Smith apples 1 recipe Whole Wheat Pie Dough (recipe follows) 2 cups orange marmalade or apricot jam Egg wash (1 large egg whisked with 2 tablespoons cold milk or water) 1/4 cup melted butter Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Combine the sugar and cinnamon in a bowl and set aside. Peel the apples, cut in half, and remove the core. Slice the apples about 1/8 inch thick.   Transfer the dough rounds to parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Spread about 1/3 cup of marmalade onto each dough round, leaving a ½-inch margin around the outside. Arrange the apples in an overlapping circle on top of the marmalade.   Brush the 1/2-inch perimeter of each dough round lightly with egg wash. Fold the dough edges in toward the center, over the fruit, pinching and folding the dough to seal the edge and create a pleated border. Brush the apples with melted butter and sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar. Brush the pleated edge of the dough with more egg wash. Bake in the oven until the dough takes on a little color and the apples are soft, approximately 20 minutes. Remove the tart from the oven and cool on the baking sheet on a wire rack for at least 20 minutes before slicing. Serve warm or at room temperature. Chef?s note: You can substitute sour cherries, apricots, peaches, or pears for the apples. WHOLE WHEAT PIE DOUGH Makes five 8-inch dough rounds 3¾ cups whole wheat flour ½ teaspoon salt ¼ cup flax seeds 1 cup (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cubed 1 cup ice water, or as needed Combine the flour, salt, and flax seeds in a large bowl and scatter the butter pieces over the dry ingredients. Using a pastry blender, or rubbing the mixture between your fingers, work quickly to cut or rub the butter into the dry ingredients until it is in pieces the size of small hazelnuts.  Sprinkle half of the ice water over the butter mixture. Using your hands or a rubber spatula, lightly toss the dry mixture until the dough just begins to hold together. Continue to add water in small amounts until it becomes a rough but pliable dough. The dough should just hold together when pressed to the side of the bowl.  Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Shape the dough into five 8-inch-diameter flat, round disks and wrap them tightly in plastic wrap. Chill the dough in the refrigerator for at least 45 minutes to two hours, or preferably overnight.

RUSTIC APPLE GALETTE,

  • December 10CIA Holiday Favorites: Does the thought of cooking an entire holiday meal from scratch make you want to turn the calendar to January? The CIA is here to help! Join us for CIA Holiday Favorites and you’ll come away with the cooking skills and recipes you need to tackle the most anticipated meals of the year. From classic dishes like roast turkey breast with gravy to non-traditional items such as sautéed duck breast with Pinot Noir sauce, you’ll learn to create mouthwatering appetizers, sides, entrées, and desserts. Along the way, you’ll discover professional techniques for carving meats, making home-style pan gravy, and presenting food that is as attractive as it is flavorful. 
  • December 14Holiday CookiesGet in the spirit and bake your holiday cookies at the CIA! We’re providing the chef-instructor, equipment, ingredients, and recipes for all your holiday cookie-making needs. From cutouts and piped cookies to slice-and-bake varieties, you’ll discover the simplicity and versatility of cookies in this class. Chocolate mint cookies, rugelach, and sugar cookies are a sample of what you’ll make and take home to share with family and friends.
learn new cooking skills

Students have fun in the kitchen during a Boot Camp class at The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY.

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